This page is/will be a collection of tips on how to accomplish a few things in LaTeX that it took me some work to figure out.

Symbol for "asymptotically or approximately distributed as"

In statistics, you occasionally run across things like or , meaning "X is approximately Normally distributed" or "X is asymptotically Normally distributed". As far as I know, there's no LaTeX command to generate either of these symbols. Here's some code I used to create them:

\newcommand*{\approxdist}{\mathrel{\vcenter{\offinterlineskip
\vskip-.25ex\hbox{\hskip.55ex$\cdot$}\vskip-.25ex\hbox{$\sim$}
\vskip-.5ex\hbox{\hskip.55ex$\cdot$}}}}
\newcommand*{\asympdist}{\mathrel{\vcenter{\offinterlineskip
\hbox{$\sim$}\vskip-.2ex\hbox{\hskip.55ex$\cdot$}}}}

And here's an example in use (what I used to create the images above):

$X \approxdist N$
$X \asympdist N$

Professional looking tables

It can be a pain to make nice looking tables in LaTeX. I pretty much start with the following code whenever I want to make a table and modify it to suit my needs. This table used a couple of different methods to align the decimals in each column - you could just pick one. (I originally created this table for an assignment - I've changed the numbers here just to demonstrate the table structure without posting the answer online.)

In the preamble, use 2 packages:

\usepackage{booktabs}
\usepackage{array}

And here's the code to create the table:

\begin{table}
\caption{ANOVA for First Order Model}
\begin{tabular} {l r@{.}l c r@{.}l r@{}l r@{}l}
\toprule
\addlinespace[-3mm]
\multicolumn{1}{b{3.5cm}}{\begin{center}Source of Variation\end{center}} &
   \multicolumn{2}{b{1.7cm}}{\begin{center}Sum of Squares\end{center}} &
   \multicolumn{1}{b{2cm}}{\begin{center}Degrees of Freedom\end{center}} &
   \multicolumn{2}{b{1.7cm}}{\begin{center}Mean Square\end{center}} &
   \multicolumn{2}{b{1.7cm}}{\begin{center}F\end{center}} &
   \multicolumn{2}{b{1.7cm}}{\begin{center}p-value\end{center}} \\
\addlinespace[-5mm]
\midrule
Regression($\beta_{1}$, $\beta_{2}$) & 745 & 1234 & 2 & 345 & 5678 & 142. &
   1234 & 0. & 098765 \\
Residual & 12 & 3456 & 5 & 3 & 6789 & & & & \\
Interaction & 0 & 1234 & 2 & 0 & 4321 & 6. & 2345 & 1. & 0987 \\
Pure Quadratic & 11 & 1111 & 2 & 23 & 7654 & 345. & 6789 & 2. & 98765 \\
Pure Error & 1 & 7676 & 3 & 9 & 9898 & & & & \\
Total & 555 & 2323 & 7 & 777 & 8765 & & & & \\
\bottomrule
\end{tabular}
\end{table}

Here's what the result looks like:

For more information about making tables in LaTeX, the Wikibooks article on the subject is pretty good.

Cursive lettering in math mode

Setting line numbers in code snippets

Aligned equations within an itemize environment