Math 233 Calculus III

Course chair

Hongkun Zhang, LGRT 1340, 413.545.2871, hongkun at math dot umass dot edu. The best way to contact me is by email.

Sections and instructors

This page will be updated periodically if rooms change. Definitive information can be found via SPIRE or from the department's course webpage. Please report any mistakes to me by email.

Math 233.1 (Anna Kazanova) MWF 10:10 - 11:00 am, LGRT 123

Math 233.2 (Giancarlo Urzua) MWF 11:15 - 12:05 pm, LGRT 123

Math 233.3 (Jinguo Lian) MWF 12:20 - 1:10 pm, GSMN 51

Math 233.4 (Garrett Cahill) MWF 1:25 - 2:15 pm, LGRT 202

Math 233.5 (Garrett Cahill) MWF 2:30 - 3:20 pm, LGRT 202

Math 233.6 (Hongkun Zhang) TuTh 9:30 - 10:45 am, LGRT 123

Math 233.7 (Tom Weston) TuTh 11:15 - 12:30 pm, HAS 138

Math 233.8 (Tom Weston) TuTh 1:00 - 2:15 pm, LGRT 123

Math 233.9 (Julie Rana) TuTh 2:30 - 3:45 pm, LGRT 123

Math 233.10 (Yao Wang) TuTh 1:00 - 2:15 pm, LGRT 202

Math 233.11 (Yao Wang) TuTh 2:30 - 3:45 pm, LGRT 202

Math 233.12 (Jennifer Koonz) TThu 11:15 am-12:30 am LGRT 123

Description

This course is part of a 3-semester sequence (131-132-233), covering standard material on differential and integral calculus at an intermediate level: more sophisticated (and much faster moving) than high school calculus, but with less emphasis on theoretical rigor than in advanced courses such as Math 523. Instead the emphasis is on basic concepts, methods, and applications suitable for students majoring in engineering, natural sciences, computer science, and mathematics. Math 233 covers calculus of functions of more than one variable.

Text

Calculus: Early Transcendentals 6e, Volume 2 (6th Edition) by James Stewart.Customized version for University of Massachusetts-Amherst. Engage Learning, 2008. This is a paperback version of the 6th edition. Make sure you have the CORRECT EDITION and VOLUME of the textbook. Homework problems will be taken from the mentioned edition. All lecture sections also require the WebAssign on-line system for homework, to which you must purchase access.

Textbook+WebAssign             When you buy a copy, be sure to buy the WebAssign coupon, too.

Due dates for homework assignments will be announced by your instructor and listed in WebAssign. Logging in to WebAssign at WebAssign.com On the log-in page, give your...

Username: your UMass Student ID number

Institution: umass

Password: umass  (change it as soon as possible, and make it something you'll remember but others won't be able to figure out!)

 

One week after the semester's start, you will need to enter your WebAssign access code when you log in. You get this access code when you buy the textbook + WebAssign package. You may also buy an access code from the WebAssign site, but that's more expensive.

Calculator

There is no required calculator for the course, although many students find them helpful. You will be allowed to use a calculator on exams, but you must show all work other than arithmetic calculations.

Course Web page

http://www.math.umass.edu/~hongkun/teach-233-10.html

Schedule of lectures

The following is meant to give a general idea of which sections are covered in which weeks. Coverage may be different depending on such factors as MWF vs. TuTh schedule, different paces of individual instructors, etc. However, it is expected that all these sections will be covered.

 

Week

Lecture

Events

Sept 6

12.1, 12.2

First lecture Tues/Wed

Sept 13

12.3, 12.4, 12.5

 

Sept 20

12.6, 10.1, 13.1

Last day to drop: Mon Sep 20

Sept 27

13.2, 13.3, 13.4

 

Oct 4

14.1, 14.2

 


Oct 11

14.3, 14.4

Holiday Mon;Tues = Mon; Exam 1 on Thursday Oct 14

Oct 18

14.5, 14.6

Last day for W: Thurs Oct 21

Oct 25

14.7, 14.8

 

Nov 1

15.1, 15.2

 


Nov 8

15.3, 10.3

 Wed = Thurs; Holiday Thurs

Nov 15

15.4, 15.5

Exam 2 Wed. Nov 17

Nov 22

16.1, 16.2

Recess ThursFri

Nov 29

16.2, 16.3

 

Dec 6

16.4

 

Dec 13

No classes

 Finals Mon-Sat


 

Grading

The grading of the course will be as follows. There will be a final exam worth 40% and two exams during the semester worth 20% each. The final 20% of each student's grade will be determined by his or her section instructor ("Instructors 20%").

All scores will be scaled to a 0-100 scale before averaging.

Final Exam

The final will be cumulative, with some emphasis placed on topics covered after the second exam. You will be allowed to bring in one (single-side only) page of notes.

The date and time of the final exam will be scheduled by the university. The final will only be given at that time, and not at any other time for any reason. In particular, adjust your travel plans accordingly; planning to leave for vacation before the final exam is a bad idea.

Exams

The dates of the exams during the semester are tentatively scheduled to be the following:

Exam 1 (pdf file) and solutions (pdf file)

These dates and times are compliant with the academic regulations issued by the Registrar.

Please be aware of these dates and write them down in your datebook. Exams will not be given at any other time. Sections covered on an exam will be announced before the exam date. Makeup exams will only be given for reasons described here. You can print and bring the formula sheet, and no other cheat sheets are allowed. There will be no cheat sheets (or formula sheet) allowed in Test 2.

 

Instructors 20%

Each instructor will determine 20% of a student's course grade, based on the student's performance in such areas as homework, quizzes, projects, attendance, etc. How this portion of the grade is computed is solely up to the discretion of your instructor. In particular, different instructors may compute this portion differently.

Suggested problems

This is a list of suggested problems from the sections in Stewart we will cover. Your instructor may or may not choose to use these problems for graded assignments. These problems are provided as an additional resource to help to prepare for exams. 

Section

Topic

Recommended Homework

12.1

Three-dimensional coordinate systems

3, 7, 11, 13, 17, 23, 31

12.2

Vectors

3, 11, 15, 19, 24, 31, 37

12.3

The dot product

5, 7, 9, 17, 19, 23, 27, 37, 39, 43, 51, 52

12.4

The cross product

1, 3, 11, 15, 29, 33, 39, 45

12.5

Equations of lines and planes

2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 11, 12, 13, 19, 25, 27, 31, 35, 39, 45, 55, 69, 71

12.6

Cylinders and quadric surfaces

3, 5, 11, 21-28, 41, 43

10.1

Curves defined by parametric equations

1, 7, 21

13.1

Vector functions and space curves

7, 11, 15, 19-24, 35

13.2

Derivatives and integrals of vector functions

3, 5, 9, 11, 19, 25, 33, 37, 49

13.3

Arc length (omit curvature)

1

13.4

Motion in space: velocity and acceleration

3, 5, 9, 11, 15, 19, 23

14.1

Functions of several variables

11, 23, 25, 29, 37, 39, 55, 56

14.2

Limits and continuity

7, 9, 27, 33

14.3

Partial derivatives

3, 5, 15, 17, 19, 21, 35, 37, 41, 47, 49, 81

14.4

Tangent planes and linear approximations

1, 3, 5, 17, 19, 25, 29

14.5

The chain rule

1, 5, 11, 13, 15, 17, 21, 27, 39

14.6

Directional derivatives and the gradient vector

1, 5, 7, 11, 13, 21, 23, 39, 53, 59

14.7

Maximum and minimum values

5, 7, 11, 29, 31

14.8

Lagrange multipliers

3, 5, 7, 19

15.1

Double integrals over rectangles

1, 5, 11

15.2

Iterated integrals

3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 15, 21, 23, 27, 35

15.3

Double integrals over general regions

1, 3, 5, 7, 13, 19, 21, 23, 39, 43, 45

10.3

Polar coordinates (omit tangents)

1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 15, 29, 31, 39

15.4

Double integrals in polar coordinates

7, 11, 19, 21, 29, 31

15.5

Applications of double integrals

3, 5

16.1

Vector fields

1, 3, 5, 11-18, 21, 25

16.2

Line integrals

1, 3, 7, 11, 17, 19, 23

16.3

The fundamental theorem for line integrals

3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 21, 23

16.4

Green's theorem

1, 3, 9, 11, 13, 19

 

Your instructor may require you to complete these problems for the Instructor's 20%. In any case, it is important that you study these problems for several reasons:

 

Practice Exams:

Below are some practice exams and review problems offered in previous semesters. While these can be useful in preparing for exams,  you should be aware that there may be significant variation  in the choice of topics and the difficulty of the questions in various exams from different terms and years. You should not assume a particular topic or type of problem on a practice exam will necessarily appear on  the exams during the present term. The choice often depends on the pace and timing of lectures in different years, and the decisions made by different groups of Math 233 instructors.  The recommended homework problems above are suitable material for exam questions,  whether or not a similar topic or question was included in an exam from a previous semester. There will be further announcements about the particular exams on this web page throughout the term. You should also consult with your instructor. The exams for Math 233 for Fall 2010 will be written by the course chair and reviewed by all Math 233 instructors.

Practice Exam Problems   Here is a collection of problems from OLD EXAMS which you can use as preparation. This up dated version includes the old exam problems from spring 2008. Here you will find the guides for studying for the different exams: Guide 1, Guide 2, Guide 3

 

Sample Exams from previous years

 

 

Review slides (created by Prof. Bill Meeks when he was the course chair for M233)

 

            Click here for a copy of the slides used in the review for Exam 1.

            Click here for a copy of the slides used in the review for Exam 2.

            Click here for a copy of the slides to be used in the review for the Final Exam.

 

Help

The best way to get help is to visit your instructor's office hours. If you can't make those, try visiting the Calculus Tutoring Center, which has drop-in hours for help with Math 131, 132, and 233. Another option is to visit the Learning Resource Center, which usually has at least a few tutors who can help with 233.

 

Calculus 233 course page 

Mathematics department